For Whom the Whistle Blows

In This Issue:

– Applicability and Protected Activity

– Procedure Governing Section 402 Claims

– Five Steps to Compliance

– For More Information

– Excerpt from Applicability and Protected Activity:

Under the terms of the 2010 Amendments to the FSMA, an employee (or any other person acting for and on behalf of the employee) who provides information, or is about to provide information, to an employer, the federal government, or a state attorney general regarding an act he or she “reasonably believes” may violate the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act, is protected from retaliation for the whistleblowing activity. Protection also exists if the individual testifies or participates in proceedings concerning violations of the Act or if he or she refuses to participate in activity that is reasonably believed to violate the statute.

Please see full Newsletter below for more information.

 Download PDF

T
Page 2 of 5
FOOD AND AGRICULTURE | E-NEWSLETTER March 2014
© 2014 Polsinelli Page 2 of 4
protected from retaliaƟon for the whistleblowing acƟvity.  
ProtecƟon also exists if the individual tesƟfies or parƟcipates 
in proceedings concerning violaƟons of the Act or if he or she 
refuses to parƟcipate in acƟvity that is reasonably believed to 
violate the statute.   
An employee does not need to demonstrate the 
disclosure was an actual violaƟon of the FDCA or other 
applicable law to receive protecƟon (or maintain a cause of 
acƟon under) the Act.  Rather,  SecƟon 402 of the FSMA 
contains a “reasonable belief” standard similar to other 
whistleblowing statutes.  Generally, this standard requires 
only that the employee have a subjecƟve, good faith belief of 
a violaƟon, even if the belief is incorrect.   
Procedure Governing SecƟon 402 Claims 
The interim rule recently released by OSHA provides that 
an employee must file a complaint with OSHA within 180 days 
aŌer the date on which the alleged retaliatory adverse acƟon 
occurred.  OSHA will invesƟgate the claim, and based upon the 
results of its invesƟgaƟon, within 60 days of the employee’s 
filing of the complaint with OSHA, will issue its wriƩen findings 
determining whether or not there is reasonable cause to 
believe that the complaint has merit.  If the employee meets 
his or her burden of showing that the protected acƟvity was a 
contribuƟng factor to any adverse acƟon taken by the 
employer, OSHA can order preliminary relief in favor of the 
employee, including reinstaƟng the employee, providing for 
back pay (including interest), and/or awarding compensatory 
damages.  If the employee fails to make this showing or the 
employer rebuts the showing by clear and convincing evidence 
that it would have taken the same adverse acƟon absent the 
protected acƟvity, OSHA can dismiss the complaint.  If no 
objecƟon is filed by either the employee or the employer 
within 30 days of their respecƟve receipts of the wriƩen 
findings, the wriƩen findings and any preliminary order 
become the final decision and order of the Secretary.   
The interim rule allows for review of the iniƟal OSHA 
decision by an AdministraƟve Law Judge (“ALJ”).  This 
decision, in turn, may be reviewed by the DOL 
AdministraƟve Review Board (“Board”) If the ARB does not 
grant the peƟƟon for review, the decision of the ALJ 
becomes the final decision of the Secretary.  If the Board  
accepts a peƟƟon for review, the ALJ’s factual 
determinaƟons will be reviewed under the substanƟal 
evidence standard, and the Board’s determinaƟon will 
become final decision of the Secretary. 
The administraƟve process may conƟnue if the 
Secretary fails to issue a final decision within 210 days aŌer 
the employee files the complaint with OSHA, or within 90 
days aŌer receiving a wriƩen determinaƟon from OSHA of 
the findings of its invesƟgaƟon.  At that point, the employee 
may file an acƟon for de novo review in the appropriate 
federal court.  A jury trial is permiƩed.  However, it is the 
Secretary’s posiƟon that a party may not iniƟate an acƟon in 
the appropriate federal court aŌer the Secretary issues a 
final decision Accordingly, a party should file a Ɵmely 
objecƟon to the Assistant Secretary’s wriƩen findings in 
order to preserve the right to file an acƟon in federal court.  
The provisions of this statute are not exclusive and an 
employee may pursue other remedies for retaliaƟon 
provided by federal or state law, although an employer may 
have arguments under some theories that certain common 
law claims are barred due to the existence of the federal 
remedy.     
Page 3 of 5
FOOD AND AGRICULTURE | E-NEWSLETTER March 2014
© 2014 Polsinelli Page 3 of 4
Five Steps to Compliance  
Employers with any relaƟonship to the food industry 
should be aware of the potenƟal of this new cause of acƟon 
and take steps to ensure that whistleblowing claims are 
handled appropriately in order to minimize potenƟal liability.  
Specifically, employers should: 
1.  Review internal policies, procedures and pracƟces to 
ensure that effecƟve anƟ‐retaliaƟon policies, 
procedures and pracƟces (including avenues for an 
employee to complain) are in existence and up‐to‐
date; 
2.  Build FSMA whistleblower reporƟng procedures into 
employee orientaƟon and training programs; 
3.  Establish and monitor compliance with policies, 
procedures and pracƟces (including the reporƟng 
of incidents by employees and invesƟgaƟons of 
compliance); 
4.  Educate managers and C‐level execuƟves on the 
employer’s policies, procedures and pracƟces to 
ensure both that any “complaint” is adequately and 
appropriately addressed and to avoid any 
appearance of retaliaƟon,  and 
5.  Manage the disclosure of confidenƟal informaƟon.  
Any comments and addiƟonal materials to be 
considered by OSHA relaƟng to this interim rule must be 
submiƩed to OSHA by April 14, 2014 
For More InformaƟon 
For quesƟons about OSHA’s interim final rule, how it fits within the overall framework of the FSMA, and how to 
ensure that your organizaƟon is protected from whistleblower complaints under this statute, please contact either of 
the authors of this alert:
 Karen R. Glickstein | 816.395.0638 | kglickstein@polsinelli.com
 Quentin L. Jennings | 816.360.4108 | qjennings@polsinelli.com
 
To contact another member of our Food and Agriculture law team,  click here or visit our 
website at www.polsinelli.com > Industries > Food and Agriculture > Related Professionals. 
To learn more about our Food and Agriculture pracƟce, click here or visit our website at 
www.polsinelli.com > Industries > Food and Agriculture. 
Page 4 of 5
FOOD AND AGRICULTURE | ABOUT March 2014
© 2014 Polsinelli Page 4 of 4
If you know of anyone who you believe would like to receive our e‐mail updates, or if you would like to be removed from our e‐distribuƟon list, 
please contact Kim Auther via e‐mail at KAuther@polsinelli.com. 
Polsinelli provides this material for informaƟonal purposes only. The material provided herein is general and is not intended to be legal advice. 
Nothing  herein  should  be  relied  upon  or  used without  consulƟng  a  lawyer  to  consider  your  specific  circumstances,  possible  changes  to 
applicable laws, rules and regulaƟons and other legal issues. Receipt of this material does not establish an aƩorney‐client relaƟonship.  
Polsinelli is very proud of the results we obtain for our clients, but you should know that past results do 
not guarantee future results; that every case is different and must be judged on its own merits; and that 
the choice of a lawyer is an important decision and should not be based solely upon adverƟsements.  
Polsinelli PC. In California, Polsinelli LLP. 
real challenges. real answers.SM  
Serving  corporaƟons,  insƟtuƟons,  entrepreneurs,  and  individuals,  our  aƩorneys  build  enduring  relaƟonships  by  providing  legal  counsel 
informed by business insight to help clients achieve their objecƟves. This commitment to understanding our clients’ businesses has helped us 
become the fastest growing law firm in the U.S. for the past five years, according to the leading legal business and law firm publicaƟon, The 
American Lawyer. With more than 700 aƩorneys in 18 ciƟes, we work with clients naƟonally to address the challenges of their roles in health 
care, financial services, real estate, life sciences and technology, energy and business liƟgaƟon.  
 
The firm can be found online at www.polsinelli.com.  
 
Polsinelli PC. In California, Polsinelli LLP.  
About Polsinelli 
About this PublicaƟon

Download PDF[617KB]
Email
Report

Note close

Firefox recommends the PDF Plugin for Mac OS X for viewing PDF documents in your browser.

We can also show you Legal Updates using the Google Viewer; however, you will need to be logged into Google Docs to view them.

Please choose one of the above to proceed!

LOADING PDF: If there are any problems, click here to download the file.